Drone Rules for the Recreational Operator…Part 2

As the drone or UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) industry continues to flourish, the publicdrone1 continues to eat up everything drone related. The FAA estimates the number of consumer drones stands at over 1.1 million and by 2021 they are expecting that number to increase to 3.5 million. With that many drones in the sky, UAV’s are a very hotly debated topic right now. Many people and government agencies have several concerns when it comes to recreational drone use, such as:

  • Privacy
  • Unmanned Aircraft vs. Manned Aircraft
  • Skill Level of Pilots

So in Part 1 of this blog we listed several rules to follow so that you can stay out of trouble and fly safely. We are going to re-list those regulations to refresh your memory, because there have been some changes to those rules. The biggest one being that you no longer have to register your drone with the FAA, as long as they are operated in compliance with section 336 of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act. If you already registered your drone and you wish to delete your registration and receive a refund of your registration fee, access the Registration Deletion and Self-Certification Form.

Here are some of those regulations to abide by:drone2

  • Always keep you UAV in your line of sight
  • Fly below 400 ft at all times
  • Never fly above a group of people
  • Make sure your drone is under 55lbs
  • Always avoid manned aircraft and never operate in a careless or reckless manner
  • Understand airspace restrictions and requirements. Know your TFR’s (Temporary Flight Restrictions)
  • Never fly within 5 miles of an airport without previous permission from both the airport operator and air traffic control tower
  • Do not fly near emergency response efforts such as fires or accidents
  • Never fly under the influence of drugs or alcohol

These are just a few of the rules that you should be following when you are flying your drone. It seems like a daily occurance where we are hearing of another drone operator not following the rules. Close calls with manned aircraft, flying in restricted areas, or causing damage or harm to people or property are the most common regulations broken. Listed below is a list of links and their descriptions that will give you all the information you could ever want about flying drones. These links are there for you to educate yourself before flying. The more you know, the less likely you are to have an issue with the regulations. Fly safe!

 

 

 

 

 

 


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