TDR-94 622-9352-005

Rockwell Collins - Mode S Transponder
Part Number :


TDR-94
FEATURES
  • Solid-state, airborne, ATC transponder providing Mode A,C, and S operation
  • Can be controlled via CTL-92 control or ARINC 429 as from a compatible ARINC 429 control unit
  • Non-diversity model for non-TCAS applications
  • 250-625 watts power output
  • Version available with altitude input via the ARINC control bus (see table below)
  • Version available with with expanded installation configuration options and enhancements to diagnostic and maintenance performance (see table below)
  • Version available with Class 3A/ADSB Mode S Transponder status (see table below)
  • Version available with improved altitude resolution status (see table below)
  • Version availabe with improved software to prevent non Collins TCAS Systems displaying a TCAS flag, or intermttent TCAS flag, when TCAS is in standby mode (see table below)
  • Version available that is compliant with European requirements for Elementary and Enhanced Surveillance for SSR Mode S operation; included is the capability for the transponder to process aircraft Flight Identification inputs and to support expanded ground station Surveillance Identifier (SI codes) (see table below)
  • Version available with ADS-B (Automatic Dependant Surveillance) capability (see table below)
  • New variant (-502) includes the ability to automatically generate a fixed flight ID from the Mode S code for U.S. registered aircraft
SPECIFICATIONS
FAA TSO: TSO-C112, class 2A RTCA: DO-181, DO-144
Software: DO-178A, level 2 EUROCAE: ED-12A
ICAO: Annex 10 Environmental: DO-160B (FAA); ED-12A (EUROCAE)
Size: 3.33"H x 4.90"W x 12.50"L Weight: 8.5 lbs.
Power Requirements: 27.5 +-2.5Vdc at 28 watts nominal, 30 watts max Power output: 250 watts min, 625 watts max
Recevier IF: 60 MHz Receiver Sensitivity: -77 dBm +-3dBm
Part Number ATC Mode S Transponder Description:
622-9352-001 original version, see features above - Discontinued
622-9352-002 Auto Altitude Mode; Same as -001 but with upgraded TCAS interface performance, and added altitude input improves the "Burst" control interface necessary for several system configurations
622-9352-003 Auto Altitude Mode; Same as -002 but with updated improvements to Mode S transponder requirements per RTCA and installation configuration options are expanded and enhancements to its diagnostic and maintenance performance is implemented
622-9352-004 Supersedes -003; Auto Altitude Mode; Same as -003 but includes upgrades for Class 3A/ADSB Mode S Transponder status
622-9352-005 Supersedes -004; Auto Altitude Mode; Same as -004 but with improved altitude resolution status for aircraft that have digital source of altitude information
622-9352-006 Auto Altitude Mode; Same as -005 but with improved software for TCAS flag
622-9352-007 Supersedes -004/005/006; Auto Altitude Mode; Enhanced Mode S; Can be installed in aircraft WITHOUT Pro Line 4 or 21
622-9352-008 Supersedes -007; Enhanced Mode S; With improved Flight ID capability; Can be installed in aircraft WITH Pro Line 4 or 21; Can also be installed in an aircraft WITHOUT Pro Line 4 or 21 if STRAP inputs are set properly
622-9352-108 Supersedes -007/8; Enhanced Mode S; With ADS-B capability; Can be installed in aircraft WITH Pro Line 4 or 21; Can also be installed in an aircraft WITHOUT Pro Line 4 or 21 if STRAP inputs are set properly
622-9352-207 Supersedes -007; Auto Altitude Mode; Enhanced Mode S; Can be installed in aircraft WITHOUT Pro Line 4 or 21
622-9352-308 Supersedes -008; Enhanced Mode S; Can be installed in aircraft WITH Pro Line 4 or 21
622-9352-309 Supersedes -004/005/006/007/008/207/308
622-9352-310 Supersedes -007/008/207/308/309
622-9352-408 Supersedes -108; Enhanced Mode S; Can be installed in aircraft WITH Pro Line 4 or 21
622-9352-409 Supersedes -004/005/006/007/108/207/408
622-9352-410 Supersedes -007/008/108/207/308/309/408/409; ADS-B Capable
622-9352-501 ADS-B Capable (DO-260B) - fixed wing application
622-9352-502 Automatically generates flight ID if absent
622-9352-551 ADS-B Capable (DO-260B) - rotorcraft application

 

622-9352-001
- Mode S Transponder
Price Condition Delivery
CALL OR RFQ CALL OR RFQ CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: Yes

622-9352-002
- Mode S Transponder
Price Condition Delivery
CALL OR RFQ CALL OR RFQ CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: Yes

622-9352-003
- Mode S Transponder
Price Condition Delivery
$1,200.00 OH OUTRIGHT CALL OR RFQ
$775.00 OH EXCHANGE CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: Yes

622-9352-004
- Mode S Transponder
Price Condition Delivery
$1,850.00 OH OUTRIGHT CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: No

622-9352-005
- Mode S Transponder
Price Condition Delivery
$1,750.00 SV EXCHANGE IN STOCK
$2,750.00 SV OUTRIGHT IN STOCK

SEA Repair Capabilities: No

622-9352-006
- Mode S Transponder
Price Condition Delivery
CALL OR RFQ CALL OR RFQ CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: No

622-9352-007
- Mode S Transponder
Price Condition Delivery
CALL OR RFQ SV OUTRIGHT CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: No

622-9352-008
- Mode S Transponder
Price Condition Delivery
CALL OR RFQ NEW OUTRIGHT CALL OR RFQ
CALL OR RFQ OH OUTRIGHT CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: No

622-9352-108
- Mode S Transponder (ADS-B)
Price Condition Delivery
CALL OR RFQ NEW OUTRIGHT CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: No

622-9352-207
- Mode S Transponder (GAMA/429 Enhance)
Price Condition Delivery
CALL OR RFQ NEW OUTRIGHT CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: No

622-9352-308
- Mode S Transponder
Price Condition Delivery
CALL OR RFQ NEW OUTRIGHT CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: No

622-9352-309
- Mode S Transponder
Price Condition Delivery
CALL OR RFQ NEW OUTRIGHT CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: No

622-9352-310
- Mode S Transponder
Price Condition Delivery
CALL OR RFQ NEW OUTRIGHT CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: No

622-9352-408
- Mode S Transponder
Price Condition Delivery
CALL OR RFQ CALL OR RFQ CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: No

622-9352-409
- Mode S Transponder (non-Diversity)
Price Condition Delivery
$21,000.00 NEW OUTRIGHT CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: No

622-9352-410
- Mode S Transponder
Price Condition Delivery
CALL OR RFQ NEW OUTRIGHT CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: No

622-9352-500
- Mode S Transponder (ADS-B, DO-260B)
Price Condition Delivery
$35,650.00 NEW OUTRIGHT CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: No

622-9352-501
- Mode S Transponder (non-Diversity)
Price Condition Delivery
CALL OR RFQ NEW OUTRIGHT CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: No

622-9352-551
- Mode -S/ATC TRansponder
Price Condition Delivery
CALL OR RFQ CALL OR RFQ CALL OR RFQ

SEA Repair Capabilities: No

Click on a question below to see the answer. If you have a question about this model that is not answered below, please contact questions@seaerospace.com

Most Mode S transponders such as the Honeywell MST-67A and Collins TDR-94D include a feature that allows it to automatically determine the aircraft Registration Number (Tail Number) of U.S. registered (N numbered) aircraft. If the aircraft is U.S. registered and operated where the tail number is used as the call sign (Flight ID), then the operator does not have to manually enter the Flight ID. Therefore, a control head with Flight ID input such as the Honeywell PS-578 or Collins CTL-92E is not required.

The transponder automatically reads the Mode S address assigned to the aircraft. If the Mode S address falls within the range of addresses assigned to the U.S. by the International Civil Aeronautics Organization (ICAO), the MST-67A will automatically convert that Mode S address to the tail number of the aircraft and place it in the Flight ID register for compliance with Elementary Surveillance.

If the aircraft is operated where the Flight ID is not the tail number or the aircraft is not registered in the U.S., then a Flight ID control head is required to allow for manual entry of Flight ID. The flight ID may contain the company-assigned number for that particular flight such as an Airline name and Flight number.
Yes, anytime a transponder is removed or replaced an altitude correlation between what the transponder is reporting and what is displayed on the altimeter needs to be performed. This is outlined in FAA CFR Part 91.413. This regulation indicates that following any installation or maintenance of a transponder where data correspondence error could be introduced, the integrated system has been tested, inspected, and found to comply with paragraph (c), appendix E. Furthermore, these references indicate that an integration test between the altitude reporting equipment and transponder system must be conducted.

For complete information, please refer to these FAA regulations or contact Southeast Aerospace Tech Support team at shop@seaerospace.com.
Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) is a component of the Next-Generation (Next Gen) Air Transportation System. ADS-B is an advanced surveillance technology that combines an aircraft's positioning source (GPS), aircraft avionics, and a ground infrastructure to create an accurate surveillance interface between the aircraft & aircraft traffic control. ADS-B provides consistent position accuracy regardless of the aircraft's range from the receiver.

The improved accuracy and update rate of ADS-B is a critical segment of the NextGen infrastructure.

The FAA has determined that it will be necessary for all aircraft operating in specific airspaces to be equipped with ADS-B Out by 2020. A nationwide infrastructure of ground stations is scheduled for completion during 2013.

As of June 2010, only ADS-B Out is being mandated. ADS-B Out provides the ATC with real-time position information. ADS-B In is the aircraft's ability to receive and display other aircraft broadcasted information as well as the services provided by the ground stations.

ADS-B requires the use of a Positioning Source. As of June 2010, any positioning source is allowed; however, WAAS is the only positioning service that provides the equivalent availability required.

A Broadcast Link is also required for ADS-B functionality. There are two available options: 1090 MHz Extended Squitter (ES) or Universal Access Transceiver (UAT). FL 180 (the lower boundary of Class A airspace) is the ceiling for operating an aircraft equipped with UAT only.

ADS-B will eventually provide weather services, air traffic information, terrain maps and other flight information services for all pilots through satellite based data and ground stations. In accordance with NextGen, ADS-B will provide benefits that address some shortcomings over other, existing surveillance systems.

Some of these benefits include:
  • Air-to-air surveillance capability
  • Surveillance in remote areas where radar coverage is unavailable
  • Real-time traffic information for aircraft not equipped with active traffic systems (ex. TCAS, TAS)
  • Reduced separation between aircraft due to sharing of flight information between aircraft
  • Better predictability in departure and arrival times

    Ultimately, ADS-B will allow aircraft to fly at safe distances from each another.

Click Here to View the official FAA NextGen Final Rule released on 5/28/10.

You may also View an SEA Summary of the FAA NextGen Final Rule (NOTE: this information has been altered for summary purposes and should be used as Reference Only).
Southeast Aerospace exchanges are based on the return of an undamaged, economically repairable core unit with identical part number as the unit shipped to the customer. An "economically repairable" core is defined as one where the cost to repair/overhaul (or Repair Cap) does not exceed 80% of the original SV/OH exchange price billed. Should the Repair Cap exceed 80%, the customer will be billed the additional amount. In the event this amount exceeds the Outright Price for the unit, the customer would only be billed the difference between the Outright Price and SV/OH Exchange Price with the core returned as-is to the customer.

Here is an example of such a transaction:

$1000 Exchange Price charged to customer
$1000 x .8 = $800 Maximum Allowable core repair charge or Repair Cap

$2000 Cost to repair core unit
- $800 Less Core repair cap
---------
$1200 Additional billing amount.

2200.00 Total Cost of transaction

Please Note:
SEA offers exchange on new items as well. However, repair cap as indicated above is still based on SV/OH exchange price.

Negotiating the exchange price of a unit only limits the allowable repair cap for the core unit. Southeast Aerospace's exchange transactions are based on the return of economically repairable core unit. Once the core is received and evaluated, the core repair cost incurred by SEA cannot exceed 80% of the original exchange price. That is, it cannot cost SEA more than 80% of the original OH/SV exchange price collected from the customer. Therefore, when and if an SEA exchange price is discounted, there is a risk that additional charges may be assessed once the core is returned and evaluated.

For more information, please refer to these other Exchange FAQs

The Mode S aircraft identification code is listed on AC Form 8050-3, Certificate of Aircraft Registration, as the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Aircraft Address Code. If the aircraft registration does not contain this information, aircraft owners with a Mode S transponder can obtain an aircraft identification code from the FAA Aircraft Registry in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. This may be accomplished by writing to the following FAA address:

Federal Aviation Administration
Aircraft Registration Branch AFS-750
P.O. Box 25504
Oklahoma City, OK 73125-0504

You may also call:
866-762-9434
405-954-3116

In installations where two TDR-94D transponders are used, but space is not available to install four antennas, special relays can be used to operate the two TDR-94D transponders with only two antennas. This configuration can also be used to operate two TDR-94 transponders with one antenna. The diagram below shows a Coaxial Switch from Ducommun (P/N: D2-729B002) completing the configuration. The described PN has been replaced by a more recent version, D2-729B003. This new version is available from Southeast Aerospace.

In relation to the transponder technology, a squawk refers to a response that a transmitter responder (i.e. transponder) is making to an interrogation from Air Traffic Control (ATC). In a classic Mode A/C transponder, a squawk response included very basic aircraft ID, general status, and pressure altitude information.

A squitter or squit is a transmission that frequently sends aircraft ID and position data while not being interrogated. In some Mode S transponders and ADS-B devices, the squit transmission can include up to almost 50 parameters including lat/long position, direction of flight, velocity, and more.